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International News


SILVER LINING. This undated photo released by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) shows a Northern Brown kiwi in New Zealand. The global conservation groupís recent update mostly included news of grave threats to many species, much of it caused by loss of habitat and unsustainable farming and fisheries practices. However, IUCN said it has upgraded the Okarito kiwi and the Northern Brown kiwi from endangered to vulnerable thanks to progress in controlling predators like weasel-like stoats and cats. (Neil Robert Hutton via AP)

From The Asian Reporter, V27, #24 (December 18, 2017), page 5.

Two kiwi birds are a rare bright spot in grim extinction report

By Elaine Kurtenbach

The Associated Press

TOKYO ó Two types of New Zealand kiwi birds are rare bright spots in a mostly grim assessment of global species at risk of extinction.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature upgraded the Okarito kiwi and the Northern Brown kiwi from endangered to vulnerable thanks to New Zealandís progress in controlling predators like stoats and cats.

But the conservation groupís latest update mostly detailed grave threats to animals and plants due to loss of habitat and unsustainable farming and fisheries practices.

It said three reptile species are now considered extinct in the wild. The whiptail-skink, the blue-tailed skink, and Listerís gecko from Australiaís Christmas Island all have mysteriously disappeared. The group said a disease or the arrival of an invasive species, the yellow crazy ant, might be to blame.

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