INSIDE:

NEWS/STORIES/ARTICLES
Book Reviews
Columns/Opinion/Cartoon
Films
International
National

NW/Local
Recipes
Special A.C.E. Stories

Sports
Online Paper (PDF)

CLASSIFIED SECTION
Bids & Public Notices

NW Job Market

NW RESOURCE GUIDE

Consulates
Organizations
Scholarships
Special Sections

Upcoming

The Asian Reporter 19th Annual Scholarship & Awards Banquet -
Thursday, April 20, 2017 

Asian Reporter Info

About Us

Advertising Info.

Contact Us
Subscription Info. & Back Issues

 

 

ASIA LINKS
Currency Exchange

Time Zones
More Asian Links

Copyright © 1990 - 2017
AR Home

 


Where EAST meets the Northwest


INSPIRATIONAL JOURNEY. Dr. Yeng Her, a Hmong American who earned an M.D.-Ph.D., reflects on a life journey that has taken him from refugee camps in Thailand as a child to a doctoral degree in medicine from the Mayo Clinic, during an interview at his home in Madison, Wisconsin. (John Hart/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

From The Asian Reporter, V27, #13 (July 3, 2017), page 7.

Hmong-American doctor inspired by heritage

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A Hmong American who recently received his medical degree plans to return to Madison, Wisconsin to pursue research on using stem cells to treat chronic pain.

Yeng Her became interested in helping people regain function after spending much of his childhood at Hmong refugee camps in Thailand surrounded by people injured during the Vietnam War, the Wisconsin State Journal reported.

"I felt powerless," he said. "That lit a fire inside of me to go into medicine and try to bridge these gaps."

The 33-year-old received his M.D. and Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The M.D.-Ph.D. program takes eight years to complete. It starts and ends with two years of medical school and has four years of graduate school in between.

Her and his family recently moved to Fresno, California, where he’ll spend a year at a medical internship. Then he’ll start a three-year residency in physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Health.

He is considering opening up a clinic in Laos, where his parents grew up, and hopes to promote higher education among Hmong Americans.

"This is the reason we’re here in the United States, that we have this opportunity," Her said. "Education is the key."

Her hopes telling his immigrant story will inspire others.

"Opening the door for people like myself, to achieve the American dream, that’s something we should do," he said.

Read the current issue of The Asian Reporter in its entirety!
Just visit <www.asianreporter.com/completepaper.htm>!